Burundi

Total Population

11,466,756 (the world fact book of CIA)

Independence

August 19, 1919.

Languages

French (official), Kirundi (official), English (official), Swahili

Form of government

Republic

GDP (2017)

$7.985 billion; per capita: $800

Background

Burundi, a small landlocked east central African country, shares its borders with DRC, Rwanda and Tanzania.
Burundi has experienced peace and stability since 2005, when its 12-year civil war ended.

Burundi, a small landlocked east central African country, shares its borders with DRC, Rwanda and Tanzania. Burundi has experienced peace and stability since 2005, when its 12-year civil war ended. The civil war, lasting from 1993, claimed the lives of about 300,000 people and was driven by ethnic tensions between Hutus and Tutsis. In 2005, rebel groups agreed to a ceasefire following an extensive peace process.

The Government of Burundi has taken steps to demobilize the armed population and integrate both Hutus and Tutsis into the public sector. In 2007, Burundi signed a Strategic Framework for Peacebuilding based on five pillars: (1) Good governance, (2) Ceasefire with rebel groups, (3) Security, (4) Justice & human rights and (5) Land issues & community recovery.

In 2012, after the successful implementation of this first strategic framework, Burundi adopted a Strategic Framework for Growth and Fight Against Poverty (CSLP II). This framework focuses on controlling population growth, improving agricultural development, and improving development cooperation, as well as more effective public spending, expanded electricity infrastructure, and a more robust private sector. Burundi has also adopted a “2025 Vision” for development.

President

H.E. Dr. Mohammad Ashraf GHANI

First Vice President

H.E. Abdul Rashid DOSTAM

Second Vice President

H.E. Sarwar DANESH

Minister Of Finance

H.E. Mohammad Humayon Qayoumi

g7+ Focal Point

Ms. Salma Alokozai - Director of National Priority Program Coordination, Policy Department, Ministry of Finance.

Governance

H.E. IdrissDéby became president in 1990, and was elected in 1996 in the country’s
first popular election. He was re-elected in 2001.

In 2005, a presidential referendum to amend the constitution to abolish term limits succeeded, and President Déby subsequently won elections in 2006 and 2011. Prime Minister Albert PahimiPadacke is the current head of government until 2018. The cabinet is the Council of Ministers; the President in consultation with the Prime Minister appoints members.

The parliament is the unicameral National Assembly. Parliamentary elections were held in 2011, the first since 2002; members are elected to four-year terms. The current president’s party is the leading political party and holds the majority of parliament’s 188 seats;

the most successful opposition party holds 10 seats, and 19 smaller parties hold one seat each. Chad’s government is centralized, and local authorities are appointed by the central government.

Socioeconomic Status

Increasing school attendance, decreased HIV/AIDS rates, improved access to clean water and
a reduction in the poverty rate have led to improvements in Chad’s social welfare.

 

The 2017-2021 National Development

 Plan managed to raise $20 billion during the roundtable meeting in Paris. The President of Chad, H.E. IddrisDeby personally invited foreign investor to come and invest in Chad.

The 2017-2021 National Development

 Plan managed to raise $20 billion during the roundtable meeting in Paris. The President of Chad, H.E. IddrisDeby personally invited foreign investor to come and invest in Chad.

Investment Climate

H.E. IdrissDéby became president in 1990, and was elected in 1996 in the country’s
first popular election. He was re-elected in 2001.

In 2005, a presidential referendum to amend the constitution to abolish term limits succeeded, and President Déby subsequently won elections in 2006 and 2011. Prime Minister Albert PahimiPadacke is the current head of government until 2018. The cabinet is the Council of Ministers; the President in consultation with the Prime Minister appoints members.

The parliament is the unicameral National Assembly. Parliamentary elections were held in 2011, the first since 2002; members are elected to four-year terms. The current president’s party is the leading political party and holds the majority of parliament’s 188 seats;

the most successful opposition party holds 10 seats, and 19 smaller parties hold one seat each. Chad’s government is centralized, and local authorities are appointed by the central government.